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  Events  |  Campaign Updates  |  Resources & Funding  |  Comic of the Month  |  Recent NewsOctober 2012      

Alliance Updates

The Sierra Nevada Alliance is seeking a Weekly Intern of Volunteer

The Sierra Nevada Alliance is seeking a volunteer or intern to lead The Weekly project. The Sierra Nevada Alliance Weekly is an electronic compilation of news articles, resources, events and tidbits regarding conservation and sustainability issues happening in, or relevant to, the Sierra and sent through a digital marketing service via email every Wednesday to subscribers. We are looking for a volunteer or intern to work 5-10 hours per week remotely after a one-day training and orientation here at the Alliance office in South Lake Tahoe. Start date preference is no later than August 15, 2012 with a one year commitment. Hours are flexible; with deadline of review on Tuesdays and distribution on Wednesday mornings.

Click here for more details

Sierra Nevada AmeriCorps Partnership Seeking Applications for Host Sites for the 2012/2013 program

The Sierra Nevada AmeriCorps Partnership (SNAP), a program of the Sierra Nevada Alliance, invites Sierra Nevada conservation organizations and agencies to apply to become a Sierra Nevada AmeriCorps Partnership Host Site. SNAP Host Sites receive full-time AmeriCorps member(s) to serve 11 months at the organization/agency from November 5, 2012 – October 4, 2013, conducting watershed restoration and assessment, watershed education projects, and volunteer recruitment and support. For more information about hosting SNAP Members at your organization, please click here

Check out our NEW Member Group Directory & Sustainablility Inventory online!!

Updated in September of 2012 for the Alliance's Annual Conference, the Member Group Directory is an online catalog of the Sierra Nevada Alliance member groups, while the Sustainability inventory is a directory of non-profit organizations that are working on sustainability issues within the Sierra Nevada. The Alliance prepared both of these directories to assist Sierra conservation organizations, agencies, interested public and the media with locating and contacting conservation organizations in the region. Each are meant to be used as an informational resource for those interested in learning more about the kind of conservation work being undertaken throughout the Sierra Nevada.

To check out our publications, click here


Resources & Funding

FEMA 2012 Community Resilience Innovation Challange

Objective: Foster community resilience nationally by identifying needs; mobilizing partners; and creating innovative, motivationsl, and effective solutions that can be grown, sustained, and repilcated.

2012 Challenge Funding: Selected projects can recieve one-time funding up to a maximum of $35,000; No financial match is required; Funds will be paid directly to the qualified and selected agency, institution, business, entity, association, organization, or group; Supports both existing initiatives and new collaborations.

Application Deadline: Postmarked October 26, 2012 or emailed by 11:59 pm PDT

Click here for more information.


Announcing a new online home for the National Complete Streets Coalition

After a summer of working on the details of this transition, we are proud to announce a new online home for the Coalition. The new web home has all the same great resources for Complete Streets advocates and practitioners. Learn about what makes a Complete Street, discover how local leaders are changing policy across the country, find out about bringing the Coalition to your town or city, and see other ways you can get involved.

Click here to explore the NCSC's new online home.


California Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation Study

In 2012 California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) concluded two years of work involving over 120 researchers from seven UC campuses and other institutions. Comprised of over 30 reports, this expansive study of California’s vulnerability to climate change addresses questions like: What do rising sea levels mean for coastal communities? With the vital Sierra snowpack shrinking, can California ensure ample water for homes and for its world-leading agriculture and wine industries? And, as temperatures climb, where is California most at risk for devastating wildfires or public-health threats to our most vulnerable citizens? The results reported below give planners, public-health officials, land-use managers, and others the research-backed basis they need to develop strategies to adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Click here for more information.


California Wildfire Information Sites

Active Fire Mapping

Incident Information System (predominantly federal lands)

Link for fires in California


Hewlett Foundation Environmental Grants

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation is offering grants through its Environment Program, which aims to conserve the Western United States for wildlife and people, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and ensure that the energy supply is clean and consumption is efficient. The program invests in a range of efforts to help build broad-based support for conservation and ensure that Western ecosystems and species thrive. Key strategies include: protecting large open spaces; restoring river flows and conserving areas near rivers and streams; reducing fossil fuel development and increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy sources; and building broad-based support for land, water, and energy goals among key stakeholders. Eligible entities: nonprofit organizations. Deadline: ongoing. Past awards have ranged from $20k up to $5m. No information is provided regarding total available funding, and matching funds do not appear to be required.

Click here for more information.


Rose Foundation

A great friend of the Alliance, the Rose Foundation for Communities and the Environment has a variety of funds dedicated to different purposes, including Grassroots Funds that award small grants to small organizations; Watershed Protection Funds that focus on specific watersheds; and several other Funds including place-based funds in Madera and Kern Counties. You can also sign-up if you would like to receive notification of any grants that may become available through various Rose Foundation's Funds.

Click here for more information.


Loans for Energy Efficiency and Energy Generation Projects

The California Energy Commission is providing loans with a low interest rate of 3 percent that can help local jurisdictions invest in energy efficiency, save money, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and build new jobs and industries for their communities. Projects with proven energy and/or capacity savings are generally eligible. Loans may have a term of up to 15 years. Eligible entities: cities, counties, special districts, public schools and colleges, public care institutions, and public hospitals. Deadline: none given. Loan applications are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. The maximum loan amount is $3m; there is no minimum. $3.6m is available.

Click here for more information.

Highlights

Lake Tahoe Protections Abandoned by Tahoe Regional Planning Agency

Sierra Club
Press Release: 12/12/12

South Lake Tahoe -- Lake Tahoe took a body blow today, as the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency handed off responsibilities for basin protections to local governments by issuing a greatly weakened new regional plan. The new plan allows increased development around the lake and throughout the basin, weakens protection for the lake and surrounding land, and entrusts local counties and the city to assert their new-found authority to care for Lake Tahoe.

The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency has mangled current planning protections, turned them on their head, and abandoned the lake, said Laurel Ames, of the Tahoe Area Sierra Club Group, noting that, "there is no evidence over the past 40 years that local agencies have the motivation, interest or ability to protect Lake Tahoe." Lake Tahoe is one of the largest and deepest mountain lakes in the United States. The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) was created by California, Nevada, and Congress in 1969 to protect Tahoe in response to the failure of local jurisdictions around the lake to regulate development or take the steps necessary to protect water clarity. After ten years of continuing local exploitation of private property around the lake, Congress revised TRPA in 1980 to get tough and strictly regulate the basin through a new set of standards.

TRPA's latest plan, approved today, delegates critical environmental protections back to local jurisdictions, leaving many to wonder if a Tahoe on development steroids will soon turn into a series of corporate resorts. Without better protections, the scenic Tahoe loved by so many will likely morph into one with more paving and less open space, new eight to ten story hotels, and mega-size recreation resorts built on acres of once-pristine lands. The result will be a murkier lake and fewer views of the mountains and the lake as local communities add three and four story buildings along the roadways.

"This plan is based on the belief that the pathway to environmental improvement is through economic development. There is definitely some merit in encouraging development to replace aging commercial buildings and parking lots. But putting all of TRPA's eggs in that basket is too risky for the golden goose that lays those eggs - Lake Tahoe," said Bob Anderson, Chair of the Lake Tahoe Sierra Club Group.

Wendy Park, an attorney with the public interest law firm Earthjustice, agrees that the new plan poses new and bigger risks. "Earthjustice has represented local interests and conservation groups in the past to protect the lake and regions around its shoreline from unbridled construction and development. The population of California is growing rapidly and Lake Tahoe needs stronger, not weaker, protections to stay the very special mountain lake everyone cherishes," Park said.

The Tahoe Area Sierra Club represents these conservation organizations committed to a strong plan to honor and protect the mountains, the forests, and the fragile nature of Lake Tahoe: Friends of the West Shore, Friends of Tahoe Vista, North Tahoe Preservation Council, North Tahoe Citizen Action Council, and Friends of Lake Tahoe."

Lake Tahoe Regional Plan update approved, hailed by state and regional leaders

Tahoe Regional Planning Agency
Jeff Cowen
12/12/12

A clear path forward for the continued restoration of Lake Tahoe was enacted today as the Governing Board of the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) approved and adopted the Lake Tahoe Regional Plan Update and Regional Transportation Plan Update, called Mobility 2035, in 12-1 votes with one Board member abstaining.

A regional plan that achieves environmental standards while allowing orderly growth and development in the Region is required by the Bi-State Compact, signed by California and Nevada, which created TRPA more than 40 years ago. Updates to the Lake Tahoe Regional Plan, often a source of controversy as well as inspiration for resource protection, was hailed by state leaders as historic and indicative of the shared commitment the two states have to Lake Tahoe’s restoration.

The closing vote was met with applause from the gallery of attendees in the convention center of Harvey’s Resort in Stateline, NV, many of whom have helped shape and shepherd the Plan Update through an exhaustive public process, according to TRPA. “Today’s approval starts the next environmental leap forward for Lake Tahoe,” TRPA Executive Director Joanne S. Marchetta said. “An unprecedented public participation process has created a plan that raises the level of stewardship of this national treasure and TRPA is grateful to the thousands of people who helped shape it.”

Updates to the Lake Tahoe Regional Plan, originally adopted in 1987, aim to accelerate attainment of extraordinary environmental goals in part by improving the regulatory framework in the Region, according to the Agency. Priority updates include:

• Accelerating water quality restoration and other ecological benefits by supporting environmental redevelopment opportunities and Environmental Improvement Program investments.
• Integrating regional and local regulations into coordinated area plans.
• Simplifying and streamlining the permit review process to encourage updates to older buildings.

“Ultimately, what happens on the land affects the waters of Lake Tahoe,” Marchetta said. “Most visitors are stunned by the beauty of Lake Tahoe, but disappointed by our aging town centers and lack of connectivity in transportation and trails. To further restoration efforts, we need to open opportunities for property owners to invest in measures that reduce pollution and help restore the Lake’s world-famous clarity.” The Regional Plan Update received supported today by state leaders who were instrumental in bringing stakeholder groups together earlier this year in a bi-state consultation group.

“This is an historic plan,” Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Director Leo Drozdoff told the Board. “For the first time in over two decades there is common ground and we have forged relations between the two states, the environmental community, business groups and local governments. We know this is just a starting point, but Nevada stands ready to continue the work we have done to create a strong and vibrant bi-state framework. You can rely on us to be here in the long term as a resource as we continue to find common ground.”

Deputy Secretary of External Affairs for the California Natural Resources Agency Todd Ferrara echoed support for the updates.

“California shares its strong support for the regional plan and the bi-state process,” Ferrara said. “It hasn’t been easy. There has been compromise as well as consensus, but many things that are hard or challenging bear fruit. We are pleased to be here today as part of this important milestone for Lake Tahoe.”

Support was also voiced by the U.S. Forest Service, which manages nearly 80 percent of the land in the Tahoe Basin.

“The updated Regional Plan, along with our revised Forest Plan will forward environmental restoration and achievement of shared goals for the region,” Supervisor for the USFS Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit Nancy Gibson told the Board. “The Forest Service recognizes that community sustainability is important for this basin. TRPA’s plans become a template for other areas of the country and will benefit generations of people for years to come.”

Most updates and amendments approved today are expected to take effect 60 days after approval, while a limited number of amendments require further state action to take effect. More information on what rules have changed and how they affect project permitting will be available at www.trpa.org in the coming weeks.


Events

Are YOU Registered to vote??

You can apply to register to vote right now by filling in the online application. If you have any questions, visit Frequently Asked Questions, contact the Secretary of State's Elections Division at (800) 345-8683 or by email.

Are You Already Registered to Vote? Click here to check the status of your Voter Registration and to find out if you are currently registered to vote.

To be eligible to vote on November 6, 2012, your registration must be postmarked or submitted electronically no later than: October 22, 2012

Green Home Tour/Fundraiser

The Sierra Nevada Alliance is hosting a fundraiser and tour of green homes in South Lake Tahoe, conducted by local green builders and featuring alternative energy solutions for residential structures. Learn how to lower your energy bills $100s/year through a number of simple measures!

Time: 9:30am – 3:30pm
Date: Saturday, November 17
Place: Alliance Parking Lot (map)
Price: $35 with lunch, $25 without
RSVP: Call Scott Terrell at (530) 386-5678 for more information or click here to buy tickets!

Smart Growth America now accepting applications for 2012 free technical assistance workshops

Smart Growth America is pleased to announce that we are now accepting applications for our 2012-2013 round of free technical assistance workshops. Communities interested in learning about smart growth strategies are welcome and encouraged to submit an application for one of our 12 technical assistance tools.

Click here to read more.

The Sugar Pine Foundation, Planting Events

Planting events - which take place in the spring and the fall - serve as a means of educating and engaging the community in forest stewardship. Volunteers learn about the importance of native plants and the threat of invasive species.

What we plant: The Sugar Pine Foundation plants blister rust resistant seedlings in burn scars, on old logging roads, on eroded slopes and in other restoration areas on private and public lands throughout the Tahoe Basin and surrounding areas.

What it does: Our planting projects help restore white pines, while also contributing to watershed health, decreasing fire risk, providing wildlife habitat and improving scenic and recreation benefits.

Upcoming Events: Peoples First Planning at Tahoe Pines, Thursday October 18, 2012 from 5pm - 6:30 pm at Tahoe Pines; Rose Foundation Grantee Convening in Berkeley, Friday October 19, 2012 in Berkeley

Click here to check out the complete event schedule for the Sugar Pine Foundation.

350.org, "Do the Math Tour"

From Bill McKibben

The goal is to jump-start the kind of movement that I discussed in the article I wrote for Rolling Stone about the scary new math of climate change. We will bring together musicians, artists and voices from across the movement to work together on directly confronting the financial and political might of the fossil fuel industry. The closest stops are in Berkeley, San Francisco, Palo Alto, Los Angeles, with other west coast and Rocky Mountain stops. They will also be putting together a live web event so that everyone who doesn’t happen to be near a tour stop can still get together and get a campaign started in their community. Visit the website for more information.

Will Proposed Hydropower Project Threaten Yuba Salmon?

Attend an important Public Meeting about the proposed Daguerre Point Dam Hydropower Project on Monday, October 22nd in Marysville at 1:00PM

Archon Energy, a Canadian firm, is hosting a public meeting to present their proposal to the community for the first time. SYRCL encourages everyone who cares about the future of Yuba Salmon in the Lower Yuba River to attend this meeting and share their concerns with the developers.

When: Monday October 22, 2012 from 1 pm - 4 pm (*site tour after meeting)

Where: Yuba County Board of Supervisors Chambers, 915 8th Street, Suite 109, Marysville, CA 95901

RSVP: Contact Miriam Limov, River People Coordinator, at (530) 265-5961 ext. 201 or RSVP on Facebook


Comic of the Month


                
Comic from www.CartoonStock.com

Newsletter contents prepared by Neil Favor.
If you have articles, events or announcements that you would like included in this newsletter or if you have feedback, please email [email protected].

Recent News

Climate Change

California Glaciers: Going, going, gone?
Rocklin & Roseville Today, Sierra College, 10.3.12

Sierra Forest
Here is one of the few glaciers that still remains in
the Sierra Nevada today.

Sierra Link: The Sierra Nevada is among the western mountain systems that have experienced some of the most dramatic loss of glacial ice. During the past two centuries, mountain glaciers around the world have shrunk, thinned and, in some cases, disappeared - all at alarming rates.

Tahoe Link: Check out Sierra College on October 26 & 27 for two lectures on How the Sierra Obtained it's Beauty and California Glaciers, respectively.


9th circuit appeals court overrules Lake Tahoe development decision
Sierra Sun, Adam Jensen, 10.15.12

Sierra Link: A federal appeals court sided with the League to Save Lake Tahoe Thursday in the environmental group's challenge to a proposed development on Tahoe's South Shore. TRPA issued five permits for the project, in addition to certifying its environmental document; the decision will send the case back to U.S. District Court and eventually back to TRPA.


Energy

California Glaciers: Going, going, gone?
Rocklin & Roseville Today, Sierra College, 10.3.12

Sierra Forest
Here is one of the few glaciers that still remains in
the Sierra Nevada today.

Sierra Link: The Sierra Nevada is among the western mountain systems that have experienced some of the most dramatic loss of glacial ice. During the past two centuries, mountain glaciers around the world have shrunk, thinned and, in some cases, disappeared - all at alarming rates.

Tahoe Link: Check out Sierra College on October 26 & 27 for two lectures on How the Sierra Obtained it's Beauty and California Glaciers, respectively.


9th circuit appeals court overrules Lake Tahoe development decision
Sierra Sun, Adam Jensen, 10.15.12

Sierra Link: A federal appeals court sided with the League to Save Lake Tahoe Thursday in the environmental group's challenge to a proposed development on Tahoe's South Shore. TRPA issued five permits for the project, in addition to certifying its environmental document; the decision will send the case back to U.S. District Court and eventually back to TRPA.


Forestry and Fire

Environmental assessment released for Rush fire
Rocklin & Roseville Today, Sierra College, 10.3.12

Sierra Forest
Here is one of the few glaciers that still remains in
the Sierra Nevada today.

Sierra Link: The Sierra Nevada is among the western mountain systems that have experienced some of the most dramatic loss of glacial ice. During the past two centuries, mountain glaciers around the world have shrunk, thinned and, in some cases, disappeared - all at alarming rates.

Tahoe Link: Check out Sierra College on October 26 & 27 for two lectures on How the Sierra Obtained it's Beauty and California Glaciers, respectively.


New law taxes lumber
Sierra Sun, Adam Jensen, 10.15.12

Sierra Link: A federal appeals court sided with the League to Save Lake Tahoe Thursday in the environmental group's challenge to a proposed development on Tahoe's South Shore. TRPA issued five permits for the project, in addition to certifying its environmental document; the decision will send the case back to U.S. District Court and eventually back to TRPA.


Mining

Forrest Shearer: Snowpack a victim of climate change
Press-Telegram, Forrest Shearer, 10.2.12

Sierra Link: Californians are trendsetters, especially when it comes to influencing younger people. Movies and television shows are made here, and environmental trends get started here - the rest of the country and much of the world end up following our lead. Through AB 32 and other smart energy policies, California is blazing a trail to a sustainable clean energy future.


Federal plan designed to create large solar energy plants
LA Times, Julie Cart, 10.13.12

Sierra Link: Solar power is good for California, but the effects on water and species in the desert just east of the Sierra are yet to be seen.


Open Spaces

California Glaciers: Going, going, gone?
Rocklin & Roseville Today, Sierra College, 10.3.12

Sierra Forest
Here is one of the few glaciers that still remains in
the Sierra Nevada today.

Sierra Link: The Sierra Nevada is among the western mountain systems that have experienced some of the most dramatic loss of glacial ice. During the past two centuries, mountain glaciers around the world have shrunk, thinned and, in some cases, disappeared - all at alarming rates.

Tahoe Link: Check out Sierra College on October 26 & 27 for two lectures on How the Sierra Obtained it's Beauty and California Glaciers, respectively.


9th circuit appeals court overrules Lake Tahoe development decision
Sierra Sun, Adam Jensen, 10.15.12

Sierra Link: A federal appeals court sided with the League to Save Lake Tahoe Thursday in the environmental group's challenge to a proposed development on Tahoe's South Shore. TRPA issued five permits for the project, in addition to certifying its environmental document; the decision will send the case back to U.S. District Court and eventually back to TRPA.


Recreation

California Glaciers: Going, going, gone?
Rocklin & Roseville Today, Sierra College, 10.3.12

Sierra Forest
Here is one of the few glaciers that still remains in
the Sierra Nevada today.

Sierra Link: The Sierra Nevada is among the western mountain systems that have experienced some of the most dramatic loss of glacial ice. During the past two centuries, mountain glaciers around the world have shrunk, thinned and, in some cases, disappeared - all at alarming rates.

Tahoe Link: Check out Sierra College on October 26 & 27 for two lectures on How the Sierra Obtained it's Beauty and California Glaciers, respectively.


9th circuit appeals court overrules Lake Tahoe development decision
Sierra Sun, Adam Jensen, 10.15.12

Sierra Link: A federal appeals court sided with the League to Save Lake Tahoe Thursday in the environmental group's challenge to a proposed development on Tahoe's South Shore. TRPA issued five permits for the project, in addition to certifying its environmental document; the decision will send the case back to U.S. District Court and eventually back to TRPA.


Water

California Glaciers: Going, going, gone?
Rocklin & Roseville Today, Sierra College, 10.3.12

Sierra Forest
Here is one of the few glaciers that still remains in
the Sierra Nevada today.

Sierra Link: The Sierra Nevada is among the western mountain systems that have experienced some of the most dramatic loss of glacial ice. During the past two centuries, mountain glaciers around the world have shrunk, thinned and, in some cases, disappeared - all at alarming rates.

Tahoe Link: Check out Sierra College on October 26 & 27 for two lectures on How the Sierra Obtained it's Beauty and California Glaciers, respectively.


9th circuit appeals court overrules Lake Tahoe development decision
Sierra Sun, Adam Jensen, 10.15.12

Sierra Link: A federal appeals court sided with the League to Save Lake Tahoe Thursday in the environmental group's challenge to a proposed development on Tahoe's South Shore. TRPA issued five permits for the project, in addition to certifying its environmental document; the decision will send the case back to U.S. District Court and eventually back to TRPA.


Wildlife

California Glaciers: Going, going, gone?
Rocklin & Roseville Today, Sierra College, 10.3.12

Sierra Forest
Here is one of the few glaciers that still remains in
the Sierra Nevada today.

Sierra Link: The Sierra Nevada is among the western mountain systems that have experienced some of the most dramatic loss of glacial ice. During the past two centuries, mountain glaciers around the world have shrunk, thinned and, in some cases, disappeared - all at alarming rates.

Tahoe Link: Check out Sierra College on October 26 & 27 for two lectures on How the Sierra Obtained it's Beauty and California Glaciers, respectively.


9th circuit appeals court overrules Lake Tahoe development decision
Sierra Sun, Adam Jensen, 10.15.12

Sierra Link: A federal appeals court sided with the League to Save Lake Tahoe Thursday in the environmental group's challenge to a proposed development on Tahoe's South Shore. TRPA issued five permits for the project, in addition to certifying its environmental document; the decision will send the case back to U.S. District Court and eventually back to TRPA.


Other Articles


During WWII, it was considered un-patriotic
to freely use valuable natural resources
that were needed overseas by our troops.

12 Great Posters From When Turning Down The Thermostat and Preparing For Winter Was a Patriotic Act
TreeHugger.com, Lloyd Alter, 10.10.12

Sierra Link: Turning down the thermostat and being careful with fuel use is a good idea any time, but in World War II it was a matter of life and death. Most of the recommendations in this poster still make sense: Winterizing your home, including insulating walls and ceilings, installing storm doors and windows and weatherstripping. Checking and cleaning your furnace can save a lot of energy, too.


Traffic Air Pollution Exposure During Infancy Harms The Lungs For Many Years
Medical News Today, Christian Nordqvist, 10.12.12

Sierra Link: Two Sierra counties, Fresno & Tulare, have cities with the worst air pollution rates in the Nation. Increasing studies are showing babies who are exposed to ambient air traffic pollution are likely to have poorer lung function up to the age of eight, especially those who are sensitized to common allergens.


Sierra Nevada Alliance

P.O. Box 7989
South Lake Tahoe, CA 96158

phone: 530. 542. 4546
fax:530. 542. 4570

www.sierranevadaalliance.org

Since 1993 the Sierra Nevada Alliance has been protecting and restoring Sierra lands, water, wildlife and communities. The regional climate change program shapes and implements county and regional resource plans that promote smart land use, incorporate sustainable water management practices, aggressively reduce greenhouse gases and adapt to climate change.